Videos you might like

Continuing in the spirit of recommending things I both enjoyed and found valuable, here’s some freely available videos that you might enjoy.

Moral Philosophy

Ever wondered what’s the right thing to do? Probably have, the reality is that philosophical questions are ubiquitous and we live them often. If you have ever thought to enquire in to ethics or moral philosophy, or should you wish to mount a succinct defence of the categorical imperative, then you should consider watching this lecture series.

It starts with discussion of relatively simplistic questions yet quickly moves to deep and important moralistic themes. The ancient Greeks warned that investigation of such questions has risks attached and so be warned. The first lecture also covers this warning.

By lecture six I’d suggest you are careful as the discussions pivot around questions that have become more complex, requiring deep thought and introspection. From then on you will need to think deeply and watch for the pivots if you are to follow without the required readings. The accompanying website linked in the videos has more information also.

Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do, by Michael Sandel

The Human Immune system

There are good reasons why, in the midst of a deadly pandemic, one might wish to understand the human immune system better. The fact that viruses are not susceptible to treatment by antibiotics is not the least of these. In this first video, Emma Bryce of TED education presents a succinct yet comprehensive overview of the human immune system and immunity.

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-does-the-immune-system-work-emma-bryce

If you are like me however, you’d like to learn more about the immune system than the basics. Accordingly I found a university level course on human physiology with free videos on YouTube. The following links to a playlist which is the section of human immunity in a full university course on human physiology, I believe to be undergraduate level for trainee doctors.

Janux: Human Physiology, by the University of Oklahoma
0 comments… add one

Leave a Comment